Tim Boyer Photography

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central Oregon

Bird Quest 2014 #17

Bird PhotographyTim BoyerComment

Last year it was about this time that I got so busy doing art shows that I thought I didn't have enough time to make new images and post them.  This year, I'm doing a few less shows and want to get out more.  So, I have two or three more posts from Central Oregon, and then I'll have some from the Oregon Coast. Most of the images today were taken during the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge/Central Oregon Photography Workshop I held last week.  These images are from the second and third days, and made with the Canon 5D Mark III and the 100 to 400 mm zoom lens, with a 1.4 Extender attached.

Great Egret, Benson Lake, Malheur NWR

Great Egret, Benson Lake, Malheur NWR

I like the Benson Pond area because the refuge rules let birders and photographers walk around a little.  And there are some  great woods that hold roosting Turkey Vultures, Egrets, and Great Horned Owls, and  other birds.  Don't miss the swallows, nighthawks, ibis, ducks, swans and sparrows that are there too!

Turksy Vulture soaring, Benson Lake, Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

Turksy Vulture soaring, Benson Lake, Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

Loggerhead Shrilke, Double O Road, near Malheur NWR

Loggerhead Shrilke, Double O Road, near Malheur NWR

The Double O Road had a little water this year, but it dried up fast.  Water that was several inches deep when I scouted, but was gone a couple of days later when I came back with the group.

Ring-necked Pheasant, Malheur NWR

Ring-necked Pheasant, Malheur NWR

Ring-necked Pheasant and Black-crowned Night-Heron are found by driving the refuge roads with the attitude, that you'll go out and see what's there.  Hardly ever is birding or photography a stake out at Malheur.

Black-crowned Night-Heron, Malheur NWR

Black-crowned Night-Heron, Malheur NWR

Bullock's Oriole, near Knox Pond, Malheur NWR

Bullock's Oriole, near Knox Pond, Malheur NWR

Savanna Sparrow, near P Ranch, Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

Savanna Sparrow, near P Ranch, Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Malheur NWR

Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Malheur NWR

Lark Sparrows, Steens Mountain Road

Lark Sparrows, Steens Mountain Road

I don't think I've ever seen two at once!  I just wish they we're backlit. But, it was cool to see!

American Robin Wenas Canyon, WA

American Robin Wenas Canyon, WA

I forgot to post this with the other Wenas Canyon birds.  No disrespect intended, I like Robins, they're always doing something interesting, and their latin name is miss understood my many.

House Finch in the cherry tree, backyard, Renton, WA

House Finch in the cherry tree, backyard, Renton, WA

We have a couple of nice cherry trees in our backyard.  I like the cherries, but it's more fun for me to see what they'll bring in.  We added House Finch to our yard list this year, and right now there's two Northern Flickers, four Robins, and two Juncos.

(Just a side note if you're interested this makes 94 bird species photographed this year.)

Enjoy!

Thanks

Tim

Bird Quest 2014 #16

Bird PhotographyTim BoyerComment

Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in June can be a contrast of bounty.  In a wet year, the baby shorebirds and song birds are right beside the road and so plentiful it's hard to decide what to take a photo of.  In a dry year , the birds are there, they're just harder to find and photograph.  This year was a dry year again,  the last wet year was 2012.  These images are from the June 20 to 22 Malheur Photography Workshop.  

Horned Lark on teh Foster Flats Road

Horned Lark on teh Foster Flats Road

I went up the Foster Flat road to see if any of the Greater Sage-Grouse were still around, I looked two mornings in a row and didn't see any. I knew it was a long shot in June, but decided to try since they are such cool birds.  I did find a bunch of sage birds, and had a nice morning up there.

Cedar Waxwing near P Ranch

Cedar Waxwing near P Ranch

After trying for the  Sage Grouse I went  down to P Ranch to see if I could find any Bobolink, and along the way I found Cedar Waxwing and Willow Flycather.

Willow Flycatcher near Benson Pond

Willow Flycatcher near Benson Pond

Yellow Warbled near Benson Pond

Yellow Warbled near Benson Pond

The Willow Flycathers and the Yellow Warblers were really singing up a storm in the mornings, this Yellow Warbler let me listen for several minutes before changing locations.

Tree swallow near Knox Pond

Tree swallow near Knox Pond

There's a swallow box near Benson Pond, and they offered some close images.

Black Tern north of Buena Vista Ponds

Black Tern north of Buena Vista Ponds

On my second day of scouting the refuge for birds, I decided to try the northern portion of the Central Patrol Road, I did manage to find a few Black Terns, but with less water, there were not many birds in this area.

Forster's Tern from the Narrows

Forster's Tern from the Narrows

Ending the  day at The Narrows, from the pull off between the lakes, Forster's Terns were flying by, and then on the way to dinner at The Narrow RV Park, they had two Common Nighthawks on the fence railings.

Common Nighthawk at The Narrows RV park

Common Nighthawk at The Narrows RV park

White-faced Ibis form near P Ranch

White-faced Ibis form near P Ranch

Also at P Ranch there were plenty of White-faced Ibis and three times in three days there were Bobolink right beside the road.  I saw more Ibis and Bobolinks in this visit then any other visit to Malheur.

Bobolink from half a mile north of P Ranch

Bobolink from half a mile north of P Ranch

Bobolin are on everybody's want list when they visit Malheur, this year it was easy, most years it's a difficult task and  involves walking on the river trail and fighting misquotes.  Glad to have it easy this year, but they're such interestingly marked birds, it's always a joy to see them.

Enjoy!

Thanks

Tim

Patience vs Perseverance

Bird PhotographyTim BoyerComment
White-headed Woodpecker
White-headed Woodpecker

For the past five years I’ve sold the images I create at art festivals, and each show I hear a few people say, “Wow, he has a lot of patience”.  They’re implying that patience was the main factor in getting the image, I think the better word is perseverance.

Patience, or the power to wait calmly, is passive, it’s waiting for something to happen.  Perseverance, or the ability to endure or persist, is much more active.

Northern Flicker
Northern Flicker

Perseverance is following the process through and not giving up.  It’s making it happen, it’s sticking with the plan.  If I sit in a photo-blind waiting for a White-headed Woodpecker to land nearby, it might be that I have patience, but not really. I know (and my friends will tell you) I’m not a patient person.  I’m active, I create images, I make it happen.  How do I do that?  I’ve studied the birds behavior, I set up the photo-blind by a water feature, and I know I’m in the right place, at the right time, in the right habitat. I know it will show up, and if I persist through the hot weather, the heat of the photo-blind etc.  I’ll make it happen, because I’ve been actively engaged in the process, and pre-planning allows for the success of perseverance.

David duChemin got me started thinking about this: PixelatedImage Blog

Images created with a Canon EOS 7D, 600mm F/4 L IS USM lens.