Tim Boyer Photography

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Photography workshop

Oregon Coast Workshop Report

Landscape PhotographyTim BoyerComment

The Oregon Coast is a fabulous place to create landscape images, with a little luck and some patience, it might all come together. the subjects are all there, it's the light that is sometimes magical, and those are the times we want to shoot!  

The first afternoon/evening session was at Siletz Bay and the Three Brothers this is a great place to start and dust off the camera gear and get start getting into the "landscape" mindset.

On Siletz Bay near Lincoln City the Three Brothers stand guard just off shore from where the Siletz River enters the bay.

On Siletz Bay near Lincoln City the Three Brothers stand guard just off shore from where the Siletz River enters the bay.

The second day of the workshop was rainy and  foggy, I'm still working on those images trying to figure out if I want them to be black & white images or not.  So in the mean time I'll just skip those.

I like to stop at Moolack beach just north of the Yaquina Head Lighthouse for the view of the lighthouse standing on the edge of the ocean.  Sometimes though the surprises are in the other direction.  By shooting looking north these bluffs look like the Napali Coast of Hawaii or someplace exotic like that.  The slow shutter speed caught some cars coming around the bend in the road as well.

Looking north up Moolack Beach.

Looking north up Moolack Beach.

I like this lighthouse because the land it sits on jets out into the Pacific, It looks and feels like a lighthouse should.  The location is dramatic, and often the clouds and lighting are too.

The Yaquina Head Lighthouse.

The Yaquina Head Lighthouse.

The weather was good so we went down to Cape Perpetua and Thor's Well for a little excitement.

The water comes up through Thor's Well before it drains back in. The water blasting out of the hole is hwer photogrphaer's need to keep thier gear dry.

The water comes up through Thor's Well before it drains back in. The water blasting out of the hole is hwer photogrphaer's need to keep thier gear dry.

The water draining back in Thor's Well is the standard image these days, but there's also something about the water blasting out that makes a pretty dynamic image as well.

The water draining back in Thor's Well is the standard image these days, but there's also something about the water blasting out that makes a pretty dynamic image as well.

The next morning from the hotel parking lot, I could see a few bright stars, so I knew it would be good at Pacific City.  Wow was it ever!

Pacific City, Haystack Rock and Cape Kiwanda on a fabulous morning of light.

Pacific City, Haystack Rock and Cape Kiwanda on a fabulous morning of light.

The beach at Pacific City just before sunrise.

The beach at Pacific City just before sunrise.

Haystack Rock and the golden sandstone of Cape Kiwanda at sunrise.

Haystack Rock and the golden sandstone of Cape Kiwanda at sunrise.

Haystack Rock and the golden sandstone of Cape Kiwanda in full morning light.

Haystack Rock and the golden sandstone of Cape Kiwanda in full morning light.

Often in late summer and early fall Common Murres can be found on beaches and rock jetties.  They molt or shed all of their primary feathers (flight feathers) at once so they can't fly.  But because they also use their wings to fly underwater, when they don't have their flight feathers they can't swim and chase fish as well.  It's as if, when they need food the most (growing feathers takes a lot of energy) it's the most difficult for them to chase fish. My theory has always been that they come ashore to conserve energy and warm up.  Their body temperature is about 100 degrees and they can lose heat quickly in the cold Pacific waters. If you come across a Common Murre or any other bird it might not be injured or sick, it could just be resting waiting for the next high-tide to take it back into the  water.

A Common Murre beached.

A Common Murre beached.

Cape Kiwanda sandstone.

Cape Kiwanda sandstone.

Newport Bridge in teh afternoon on a scouting stop.

Newport Bridge in teh afternoon on a scouting stop.

Newport Bridge way after sunset and a really long exposure.

Newport Bridge way after sunset and a really long exposure.

It was a great week on the Oregon Coast we also stopped at the North Fork of the Yachats River Bridge, one of 50 remaining wooden covered birdges in Oregon, Seal Rocks, Agate Beach, hiked up to the top of Cape Kiwanda and hiked up part of the Cascade Head trail.

Enjoy!        Thanks          Tim

Skagit - Samish Workshop 1-2-15

Bird PhotographyTim BoyerComment
Long-eared Owl Canon EOS 7D Mark II 1/200 of a second, f/8, and ISO 320 at 400mm on the Canon 100 to 400 zoom lens.

Long-eared Owl Canon EOS 7D Mark II 1/200 of a second, f/8, and ISO 320 at 400mm on the Canon 100 to 400 zoom lens.

Sometimes you just have to wait.  Inbetween groups of photographers and birders there was a time when there were only a few people around and this owl decided to move up in the tree.  It gave me a clear shot but only lasted a minute or two.

In the trees and bushes next to the owl there was a Bewick's Wren.

Bewick's Wren. 1/500 of a second, f/7.1 at ISO 400. Canon 7D Mark II.

Bewick's Wren. 1/500 of a second, f/7.1 at ISO 400. Canon 7D Mark II.

While standing around looking at the view of Mount Baker I said, "Now if some Snow Geese would  fly by!", several minutes later some did.   Wow, I'm gonna ask more often for what I want to see.

Mount Baker and Snow Geese. 1/1600 of a second, f/5.6 at ISO 320. at 400 mm on the 100 to 400 zoom lens.

Mount Baker and Snow Geese. 1/1600 of a second, f/5.6 at ISO 320. at 400 mm on the 100 to 400 zoom lens.

On Fir Island we found a berm we could climb upon and  practice taking flight shots of Tundra Swans as they changed fields they were feeding in.

Tundra Swans. 1/1250 of a second, f/8, at ISO 320. 400 mm witht eh 100 to 400 Canon zoom lens.

Tundra Swans. 1/1250 of a second, f/8, at ISO 320. 400 mm witht eh 100 to 400 Canon zoom lens.

There were a lot of Red-tails out, I like this one because it looks like it has a full crop, that budge below it's head.  A well fed hawk is a good thing.

Red-tailed Hawk. 1/250 of a second, f/8 at ISO250 Canon 7D Mark II and the 100 to 400 mm zoom lens at 400 mm.

Red-tailed Hawk. 1/250 of a second, f/8 at ISO250 Canon 7D Mark II and the 100 to 400 mm zoom lens at 400 mm.

There also seemed to be more Rough-legged Hawks then I've seen the past couple of years, we had flight opportunities several times.

Rough-legged Hawk. 1/800 of a second at f/8 and ISO 250. Canon 7D Mark II.

Rough-legged Hawk. 1/800 of a second at f/8 and ISO 250. Canon 7D Mark II.

Rough-legged Hawk same settings as above.

Rough-legged Hawk same settings as above.

Towards the  end of the  day we were south of Stanwood looking for Barred and Barn Owls, we couldn't locate them, but there was this nice looking tree and the moon was out, so... I never turn down a landscape opportunity.

Tree & Moon. 1/250 of a second f/7.1 ISO 320 witht eh Canon 7D Mark II.

Tree & Moon. 1/250 of a second f/7.1 ISO 320 witht eh Canon 7D Mark II.

Enjoy!     Thanks    Tim

Birding/Photo Project #6 & More San Diego Images

Bird PhotographyTim BoyerComment
The calm waters of Bolsa Chica at sunrise.
The calm waters of Bolsa Chica at sunrise.

Magical sunrise at Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve. While Bolsa Chica is a legend in the birding and bird photography communities, I did not fair so well in my San Diego Workshop trip.  The sunrise was magical, and I created the pan blur below.  Some days it’s just better to enjoy the view.

I did add a few new species to this year’s goal of photographing 500 species of birds.

Savannah Saprrow at Bolsa Chica, morning light.
Savannah Saprrow at Bolsa Chica, morning light.
White-crowned Sparrow at Bolsa Chica Reserve, morning light.
White-crowned Sparrow at Bolsa Chica Reserve, morning light.
Northern Pintail, drake at Bolsa Chica.
Northern Pintail, drake at Bolsa Chica.
A male Surf Scoter in the calm protected waters at Bolsa Chica.
A male Surf Scoter in the calm protected waters at Bolsa Chica.
Western Grebe in the still waters of morning, Bolsa Chica.
Western Grebe in the still waters of morning, Bolsa Chica.