Tim Boyer Photography

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Mourning Dove

Wenas Canyon & Eastern Washington Workshop Report

Bird PhotographyTim BoyerComment

Just a quick update on the Wenas Canyon Eastern Washington Photography Workshop.  Here are a few images from the last two days!  

First shot of the  two-day workshop.  Beautiful light on this Mourning Dove.
First shot of the two-day workshop. Beautiful light on this Mourning Dove.
Day one was all about Western & Mountain Bluebirds.  This Mountain Bluebird was very attentive to the chicks in the nest box. He made about 3 times the  trips with food than the female.
Day one was all about Western & Mountain Bluebirds. This Mountain Bluebird was very attentive to the chicks in the nest box. He made about 3 times the trips with food than the female.
This Black-headed Grosbeak was pretty far away, so I had to crop this image quite a bit.
This Black-headed Grosbeak was pretty far away, so I had to crop this image quite a bit.
Day two started out with Burrowing Owls and I love the  attitude this one is giving us.
Day two started out with Burrowing Owls and I love the attitude this one is giving us.
Our second stop was the County Line Ponds near Othello.  This Black-necked Stilt is in the  process of landing.
Our second stop was the County Line Ponds near Othello. This Black-necked Stilt is in the process of landing.
Wilson's Phalarope at County Line Ponds.  For some reason, there are no American Avocets at the ponds but there were more Wilson's Phalaropes then I've seen there before.
Wilson's Phalarope at County Line Ponds. For some reason, there are no American Avocets at the ponds but there were more Wilson's Phalaropes then I've seen there before.
Lark Sparrow at the Ginko State Park in Vantage.  We saw several and some had food they were carrying to chicks.
Lark Sparrow at the Ginko State Park in Vantage. We saw several and some had food they were carrying to chicks.
Rock Wren not on rocks but at the base of one of the large trees in the park.
Rock Wren not on rocks but at the base of one of the large trees in the park.

It was a fun two-day bird photography workshop.  We had some birds we didn't expect (like Lark Sparrow) and missed some we thought we'd get (like American Avocet).  There were seven chicks at the Burrowing Owl nest site, with two adults for  nine total an all time high, so that was good to see since their overall population in the Columbia Basin is declining.

Enjoy!     Thanks    Tim

Bird Quest 2014 #18

Bird PhotographyTim BoyerComment

What happens when you mix Cascade Pine Forest, the high desert sage eco-system of Eastern Oregon and a little water?  ....An incredible variety of birds!  Heres the first eight of the sixteen birds I added to this years list.  

Red Crossbill
Red Crossbill
Gray Flycatcher
Gray Flycatcher
Male Western Tanager
Male Western Tanager

I confess I've wanted to get a good Western Tanager image for years, I got several on this trip.  What a special bird for us out west.

Northern Flicker
Northern Flicker

Always photogenic the male Northern Flicker perches prior to diving down to the water for a drink.

Mourning Dove
Mourning Dove

Soft light really shows the beauty of a Mourning Dove.

Pygmy Nuthatch
Pygmy Nuthatch
Clark's Nutcracker
Clark's Nutcracker
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Eurasian Collared-Dove

I was surprised to see a Eurasian Collaared-Dove fly in, perch and take off, all in one fluid motion.  It was like an Air Force touch and go landing practice.

I made these images with a Canon 5D Mark III and the 600mm lens.  I used a 25mm extension tube so I could focus closer.  Yes, they were that close!  A couple of years ago I tried to use the 600mm lens with the Canon 7D and I had too much lens, I ended up shooting too tight - even for me.  I set the aperture to f/8 wanting to capture as much fine feather detail as possible, this really helped with the sharpness and increased the depth-of-field a little.

Enjoy!

Thanks

Tim

More SE Arizona Images

Bird PhotographyTim BoyerComment

Desert birds amaze me, some are so bright and bold in their coloration and yet others are so well camouflaged. This post has some of the more camouflaged winter residents of SE Arizona. The first set of images is from The Pond at Elephant Head.  

Greater Roadrunner on a Saguaro cactus stump.
Greater Roadrunner on a Saguaro cactus stump.
Cactus Wren searching for food.
Cactus Wren searching for food.
Mourning Dove in early morning light.
Mourning Dove in early morning light.
Canyon Towhee
Canyon Towhee
Brewer's Sparrow on a perch.
Brewer's Sparrow on a perch.
Gambel's Quail.
Gambel's Quail.
The ubiquitous, non-native species House Wren is even in the desert.
The ubiquitous, non-native species House Wren is even in the desert.
Rufous-winged Sparrow, seems plain until it flys, then it has rufous colored coverts.
Rufous-winged Sparrow, seems plain until it flys, then it has rufous colored coverts.

These next two images are from Gene Reid Park Park in Tucson.  It's a lot easier to get close to Canvasback and Redhead ducks when they aren't being hunted.

Canvasback aren't as shy in this wintering location.
Canvasback aren't as shy in this wintering location.
Redheads are shy but very beautiful birds.  One of my favorite ducks.
Redheads are shy but very beautiful birds. One of my favorite ducks.

The next three images are captive birds of prey from the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.

Ferruginous Hawks are one of the  largest hawks of North America.
Ferruginous Hawks are one of the largest hawks of North America.
Prairie Falcon on the verge of taking flight.
Prairie Falcon on the verge of taking flight.
A Great Horned Owl taking off from a perch at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.
A Great Horned Owl taking off from a perch at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.