Tim Boyer Photography

Small Groups, Cool Birds, Fun Locations

Oregon Coast Workshop Report

Landscape PhotographyTim Boyer

The Oregon Coast is a fabulous place to create landscape images, with a little luck and some patience, it might all come together. the subjects are all there, it's the light that is sometimes magical, and those are the times we want to shoot!  

The first afternoon/evening session was at Siletz Bay and the Three Brothers this is a great place to start and dust off the camera gear and get start getting into the "landscape" mindset.

On Siletz Bay near Lincoln City the Three Brothers stand guard just off shore from where the Siletz River enters the bay.
On Siletz Bay near Lincoln City the Three Brothers stand guard just off shore from where the Siletz River enters the bay.

The second day of the workshop was rainy and  foggy, I'm still working on those images trying to figure out if I want them to be black & white images or not.  So in the mean time I'll just skip those.

I like to stop at Moolack beach just north of the Yaquina Head Lighthouse for the view of the lighthouse standing on the edge of the ocean.  Sometimes though the surprises are in the other direction.  By shooting looking north these bluffs look like the Napali Coast of Hawaii or someplace exotic like that.  The slow shutter speed caught some cars coming around the bend in the road as well.

Looking north up Moolack Beach.
Looking north up Moolack Beach.

I like this lighthouse because the land it sits on jets out into the Pacific, It looks and feels like a lighthouse should.  The location is dramatic, and often the clouds and lighting are too.

The Yaquina Head Lighthouse.
The Yaquina Head Lighthouse.

The weather was good so we went down to Cape Perpetua and Thor's Well for a little excitement.

The water comes up through Thor's Well before it drains back in. The water blasting out of the hole is hwer photogrphaer's need to keep thier gear dry.
The water comes up through Thor's Well before it drains back in. The water blasting out of the hole is hwer photogrphaer's need to keep thier gear dry.
The water draining back in Thor's Well is the standard image these days, but there's also something about the water blasting out that makes a pretty dynamic image as well.
The water draining back in Thor's Well is the standard image these days, but there's also something about the water blasting out that makes a pretty dynamic image as well.

The next morning from the hotel parking lot, I could see a few bright stars, so I knew it would be good at Pacific City.  Wow was it ever!

Pacific City, Haystack Rock and Cape Kiwanda on a fabulous morning of light.
Pacific City, Haystack Rock and Cape Kiwanda on a fabulous morning of light.
The beach at Pacific City just before sunrise.
The beach at Pacific City just before sunrise.
Haystack Rock and the golden sandstone of Cape Kiwanda at sunrise.
Haystack Rock and the golden sandstone of Cape Kiwanda at sunrise.
Haystack Rock and the golden sandstone of Cape Kiwanda in full morning light.
Haystack Rock and the golden sandstone of Cape Kiwanda in full morning light.

Often in late summer and early fall Common Murres can be found on beaches and rock jetties.  They molt or shed all of their primary feathers (flight feathers) at once so they can't fly.  But because they also use their wings to fly underwater, when they don't have their flight feathers they can't swim and chase fish as well.  It's as if, when they need food the most (growing feathers takes a lot of energy) it's the most difficult for them to chase fish. My theory has always been that they come ashore to conserve energy and warm up.  Their body temperature is about 100 degrees and they can lose heat quickly in the cold Pacific waters. If you come across a Common Murre or any other bird it might not be injured or sick, it could just be resting waiting for the next high-tide to take it back into the  water.

A Common Murre beached.
A Common Murre beached.
Cape Kiwanda sandstone.
Cape Kiwanda sandstone.
Newport Bridge in teh afternoon on a scouting stop.
Newport Bridge in teh afternoon on a scouting stop.
Newport Bridge way after sunset and a really long exposure.
Newport Bridge way after sunset and a really long exposure.

It was a great week on the Oregon Coast we also stopped at the North Fork of the Yachats River Bridge, one of 50 remaining wooden covered birdges in Oregon, Seal Rocks, Agate Beach, hiked up to the top of Cape Kiwanda and hiked up part of the Cascade Head trail.

Enjoy!        Thanks          Tim